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Plan, Plan, Plan – Best Practices for Webinar Invitations

Posted by Anthony Salas on
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I am sure you have received one or two (probably many more) invitations to attend webinars. They are a part of our daily business lives. So when the time comes to send out your own invitation, what do you do to make it stand out from the others? Following are some “best practices” to consider when preparing your webinar invitation.

Grab ‘em with a WOW title!

The first place you can “grab” your audience is with the title of your webinar. Keep it short and to the point – ideally with some sort of takeaway or action item. If your title approaches 15 words in length, it is too long. Are there any hot-button items related to your topic? If so, mentioning one of those in the title just might get them to keep reading – and register! Just make sure the title is clear and not misleading.

Time (zone) is of the essence

Selecting the date and start time is important. If you are inviting participants from across the country – or even the world – you should including the participant time zones in your invitation. I have seen some invitations that even list the start time by the time zones across the country. Pointing this out to your audience shows that you care about their schedules and truly want them to attend your webinar.

Map out your description

Okay, you piqued someone’s attention. He or she is still reading your invitation and now comes the full description of your webinar. This is where you can go on and on and provide tons of information, right? Well….not entirely! Following is great advice from an article written by Karen Gedney:

    I've seen a number of eye-tracking heat maps for Webinar invitations, and they all show basically the same thing: people pay the most attention to the first two horizontal lines of your first paragraph, which you would expect. Then, in the main copy area, readers seem to focus on the left side of the page, taking note of the first few subheads between paragraphs and beginning words of any bullet points.

    It's important, then, to frontload your copy, putting the most important keywords at the beginning of a paragraph or bullet point. Also, make sure those subheads highlight your audience's hot-button issues.

    It's a new way of writing, but it could be worth the effort. As I've talked about in past columns, when I frontload subject lines with keywords, response rates soar. Now it could be just as important to train yourself to write keywords in the beginning of sentences.

    Another place that people focus is on photographs of people. If you have headshots of your speakers, put them in. And write compelling captions for those photos to encourage registrations.


Colorful logos and catch words

A little color can go a long way, and too much black-and-white text can quickly bore someone. Make sure your branding logo is attractive and colorful, and think about using a colored font for some hot-button words that will attract someone and entice him or her to keep reading! But, don’t get too carried away or it will hard to read.

The invitation you send for a webinar is quite possibly the most important part of the preparation process. It is the first communication to your prospective participants, and it is your one chance to grab their attention. Take your time when preparing your invitation and don’t be afraid to be creative!

What do YOU do to make your webinar invitations stand out? Please share your ideas with us – the possibilities are endless!


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