Oprah’s Apology

After the Oprah webcast heard around the world, Oprah issued an apology for the amount of people that experienced technical difficulty. The apology can be read through the link I provided.

On one hand, as a consumer, I applaud Oprah for issuing an apology and offering the recorded session to all people. On the other hand, as an employee in the industry, I am sad that this great chance to show off our technology fell flat for so many people. This brings me to my point:Expectations.

Oprah should have set expectations for this event knowing that it was possible they would get 500,000 people logging on. They should have acknowledge the possibility of an internet traffic jam. My wife brought up a good point: They should have broadcast the interview to the US audience on TV to free up bandwidth for the rest of the world.

[tags]Oprah, webcast, webinar, Eckhart Tolle [/tags]

Oprah’s Apology

After the Oprah webcast heard around the world, Oprah issued an apology for the amount of people that experienced technical difficulty. The apology can be read through the link I provided.

On one hand, as a consumer, I applaud Oprah for issuing an apology and offering the recorded session to all people. On the other hand, as an employee in the industry, I am sad that this great chance to show off our technology fell flat for so many people. This brings me to my point:Expectations.

Oprah should have set expectations for this event knowing that it was possible they would get 500,000 people logging on. They should have acknowledge the possibility of an internet traffic jam. My wife brought up a good point: They should have broadcast the interview to the US audience on TV to free up bandwidth for the rest of the world.

[tags]Oprah, webcast, webinar, Eckhart Tolle [/tags]

Oprah’s Webcast

The other night Oprah had a webcast for her book of the month club. She was interviewing Eckhart Tolle for his new book called A New Earth. My wife had signed up for the webcast so I was helping her log on before the webcast started. My wife had tested her computer the day before from an e-mail that was sent to every registrant. There was a small download to install that would allow the webcast to run on your computer's browser.

She was logged in and ready to go at 7pm MST. At first everything went smoothly and then about 20 minutes into it, my wife came upstairs and said the video was stuttering. Being a former web conferencing support tech, I went downstairs and did some speed tests to Chicago. Every server I hit in America was registering great speed except to the server in Chicago from which I could not even connect too.

I had never been on the receiving end of a poor quality webcast and it was quite frustrating to my wife. It is too bad because Oprah had a great chance to show of this exciting technology and it fizzled.

[tags]Oprah, Eckhart Tolle, webcast [/tags]

 

Oops, looks like Opera broke the internet. Appe

Web Seminars, Free and Easy

06_large20080121.jpgI attended my first ReadyTalk web seminar a few weeks ago ("attended" being a euphemism for "sat in my scivvies in front of my iMac"). In fact, it was my first web seminar ever. I'm not a Luddite – I've just never had a reason to attend one before. But this seminar was on podcasting, and as a parent, I consider it good policy to learn about new technology before my kids do.

I didn't want to go into the seminar totally clueless, so I downloaded and read a couple of ReadyTalk's whitepapers on podcasting. I learned that podcasts are digital recordings of audio or video content that you can download to your computer, iPod, or cell phone and listen to whenever you want. ReadyTalk provides services to record and host podcasts.

Armed with this knowledge, I signed up for the podcasting seminar on the ReadyTalk website. It was really easy to do and more importantly, didn't cost me any money. They didn't even ask me any personal information, like would I be attending in my scivvies. I get very skittish whenever I feel my privacy is being invaded, so that was refreshing.

The problem was, I waited until 10 minutes before the seminar began to sign up for it. By then, it was apparently too late to attend because I never got an email confirmation with the instructions for getting into the seminar. My bad.

So I called up ReadyTalk for help. I expected to be put into phone menu purgatory, but instead, a really nice, young-sounding woman answered. I explained my problem and she apologized profusely as if it were her fault that I was such a ninny for signing up so late. Then she immediately put me into the seminar. I can't remember the last time I had such a pleasant customer support experience. In fact, it was so good, I'm hoping to screw up again next time.

The web seminar itself was excellent. Shawn Cardinal, ReadyTalk's Training Director delivered it. He was engaging, professional, and knowledgeable. That's really important in a web seminar because unlike an actual seminar, there's usually no one sitting next to you to keep you awake. Particularly if you're in your scivvies.

Bottom line, attending this ReadyTalk web seminar was such a positive experience, I plan to sign up for more. The Web Seminar Series covers topics such as web conferencing for franchises, preventing conflict escalation, and taking the guesswork out of hiring, among many other diverse topics. And they're all free.

I might even dress appropriately for the next one.

[tags]podcasting, web seminars, customer service[/tags]

Personal Touch Nurturing Programs

I came across this post today from Mike Volpe on his HubSpot blog. The post takes a much talked about program, in this case lead nurturing, and uses a real life experience to draw out the lessons. To me, this is always more powerful than theorizing.

What I really liked about this post is that Mike uses technology to assist his relationship not hinder it; as can be the case today. We have so aos many tools at our disposal that we often confuse "e-mail drip" as nurturing. Mike used technology. Admittedly, he used facebook, his blog, salesforce and a webinar. However, the difference was he injected the human touch into each of these technologies. Not once, did Mike resort to mass communication with Kristen. Each contact he had built upon their previous contact – he gained momentum and traction with each post.

We are implementing nurturing programs here at ReadyTalk and I am trying to find that balance between automated communication and personal touch. I believe to be efficient and effective a proper mix of both is needed. What area some of the ways you mix automation with the personal touch for your nurturing campaigns?

[tags]B2B, lead generation, Mike Volper, HubSpot [/tags]