A Summer at ReadyTalk

I am new at Readytalk and this is my first time participating in a blog.  I am an intern working here for the summer and I am helping out with whatever needs to get done in the marketing department. So far, I am doing SEO stuff and working with the Web Seminar Series. If you don't know what SEO is don't worry, neither did I when I first heard the term. Everyday I learn something new about SEO and hopefully will have some chances to write on the blog about my progress and learning.

At the end of the summer, I will be returning to my beloved Brigham Young University to continue my education (two more years!). At school, I enjoy playing on my intramural basketball team, but have yet to play in the championship game. Besides basketball, I love hiking in Southern Utah, backpacking and alpine fishing. If you have any questions about great places to go in Colorado or Southern Utah just let me know, I have been traveling those wildernesses for my entire life.

ReadyTalk is an awesome company and I really enjoy it so far. Everyone here is very nice and always willing to help with any question that I have. In the short time that I have been working here I have learned a lot about web conferencing and I am grateful for this opportunity to be part of the ReadyTalk team.

I really look forward to working here at ReadyTalk and participating in the blog. Mike told me that as I post on the blog I will have to find my own "voice." I just hope Ursula hasn't stolen it yet and I can still write some interesting stuff.

[tags] SEO, Brigham Young University, web conferencing [/tags]

The “Ps” in Podcasting

I've been doing some research on podcasting. What I've discovered is that most of the important topics related to podcasting start with "P", such as planning, performing, producing, and promoting. That's convenient, because it allows me to use the contrivance of "Ps" in a pod(cast) to "shell out" what I've learned about podcasting in this and future blogs.

I'll start with "Popularity". Podcasting is a relatively new communication tool – the term itself has only been around since 2004. But it appears to be catching on. A January 2008 study by eMarketer, estimated that in 2007, there was an active U.S. podcast audience of 6.5 million. These are people who downloaded at least one podcast per week. This number is expected to grow to 25 million by 2012.

That doesn't seem like a lot, considering that 56% of American households have at least one personal media player (most of which are iPods), and many had two or more, according to the industry research group, IDC. Apparently, people would still rather use their iPods to download Duffy songs for free from Starbucks.

As it turns out, an April 2008 study by Arbitron/Edison Media Research found that most people – 75% – listen to podcasts on their computer. When and where they're doing it isn't clear to me, but I'm willing to bet a fair amount of it occurs surreptitiously at work.

If any of these numbers are to be believed (this is internet research, after all), it looks like a great opportunity for business podcasting. Podcasting's popularity is growing, and if you can deliver useful, business-related content to your audience, they'll welcome a legitimate excuse to take time out of work to listen to what you have to say.

Are you a podcaster or podcast subscriber? Let me know your thoughts. In the meantime, eat your vegetables.
[tags]B2B, Podcasting, Podcasts, Social Media[/tags]