5 Reasons Why Putting on a Webinar Scares People

Just like Halloween, putting on a webinar can be scary. There are lots of variables and many things can go wrong. Here are a few reasons people are nervous to host webinars and ways to tackle those fears:

5. Mastering the Technology: Technology can be intimidating especially when your presentation depends on it. While ReadyTalk’s webinar tools are easy to use and designed to eliminate this concern, we still recommend that conference organizers and their speakers do a full dry run prior to the event. This ensures everyone on the webinar is comfortable with the technology and the content of the presentation.

4. Poor Participant Experience: We’ve all been on those bad webinars where the chairperson forgets to put all 500 participants on mute or turn off the conference entry tones. We often encourage customers to have the event organizer appoint someone that is solely responsible for running the meeting. This person doesn’t have speaking or moderating duties and can focus on the technical details as well help with queuing up the chat questions and other logistics.

3. Boring: There’s nothing worse than joining a webinar that promised interesting content that falls flat. Worse than that is when the presenter isn’t engaging. Polls and questions are a great way to engage the audience and prevent a boring webinar. ReadyTalk’s lead trainer, Shawn Cardinal, hosts free training sessions to help presenter’s learn skills for engaging the audience.  

2. No One Shows Up: So much time and energy goes into scheduling and hosting webinars—writing a compelling abstract, lining up speakers, scheduling dry-runs, invitations, reminders and more. There is nothing scarier than wondering if anyone will show up. Make sure your pre-event plan includes promotion. ReadyTalk’s integration with marketing automation and new social media tools make it easier to leverage your existing networks and reach new audiences.

1. Public Speaking: This is a common fear. However, many people find webinars to be easier because you can’t see the audience. Another way to ease your fears is to practice, practice, practice. If you’re familiar with the content and the technology it will make presenting much easier.

Do webinars scare you? Why? What have you done to overcome your fears?

Eloqua Experience a Hit with ReadyTalk

I just got back from the Eloqua Experience show in San Francisco and it was a great show for ReadyTalk. We showcased our integration into Eloqua that helps marketers streamline their webinar processes and increase conversion rates for their sales team. There was a lot of buzz around our booth and great interest our integration since it solves a large pain point for marketers who run webinars.

The attendance at my session also reinforced our perception that marketers are very interested in solving this pain. While it was the last session of the show, the room was packed and there were a lot of questions during my presentation and also quite a few people who came up to me after the session to ask very detailed questions. I was very impressed with their engagement and knowledge of both Eloqua and the webinar process.

While we did not win a Markie Award in the category of Sales Impact it was an honor to be a finalist and to sit up front during the awards ceremony. Joe Payne, the CEO of Eloqua, hosted the event and is very dynamic and entertaining speaker.

I would like to thank Eloqua for such a great event and I am looking forward to next years already!

Picking the Perfect Hold Music

This week, we rolled out some new hold music on ReadyTalk's audio conferencing bridges. You would think choosing the perfect hold music would be an easy task. Just pick the music that fades into the background, annoys people the least, and sounds neutral…right? That's not always the case.

Picking hold music is tough. There are limitations around music available to us. There's a world of musical tastes, general annoyance around being on hold in general – the decision of what hold music to choose becomes monumentally hard!

We've heard some surprising feedback, including someone who threatened to bite their own forehead if we didn't change our hold music (I'm not exactly sure how that works)! We don't want our customers hyper-extending their jaws or causing any unnecessary bodily harm/property damage, so we are trying to mix up our hold music a little bit more. We hope you enjoy the latest choice. I find it somewhat uplifting, not at all grating, and a little hopeful. Most importantly, i think it fades in the background sufficiently allowing you to wait for your next ReadyTalk meeting in peace.

If you have any feedback, please let us know in the comments!

Paul was formerly an Account Executive at ReadyTalk gaining valuable experience with competitors and the state of the web and audio conferencing industry. Currently in his role as Product Marketing Manager, he is in charge of the competitive landscape, on-demand audio products, and the web meeting interface. Paul loves the outdoors, his pup Huck, his wife Jess, and getting to the ski slopes as much as possible.

Creating an Organizational Chart

 

Today's post is contributed by Nario Young, who works in the accounting and HR department at ReadyTalk.

ReadyTalk is a company that has built a culture that is warm and welcoming to new employees. We care about employees and want them to fit in right from the beginning.

But for new employees, it can be a  challenging task to learn the names and faces of existing employees. And, because ReadyTalk is growing so quickly, it can be hard for old timers to get to know new employees.

We needed an organizational chart so  we can familiarize with names and faces as we walk by each time.

So we did it, we mapped out all employees and sorted by departments. We cut and pasted and made a few big posters. We planned to add new employees and make major updates every quarter.

It is totally wrong!  As our business is growing rapidly, we had to add lots of people, move people to other departments and take a couple of people off. The chart got messy. We said good bye to the old chart and switched to a magnetic whiteboard. Each employee has his/her own magnet and the departments are color coated. It allows me to easily add new employees and shift things around.

Now, we just have to keep employees from moving pieces.

How does your company keep it's organizational chart and help people learn names and faces?

Meet Jason Collins, VP of Engineering and Nerd Shenanigans

Jason CollinsJason Collins is the Vice President of Engineering and Nerd Shenanigans at ReadyTalk. He's been doing this long enough that he remembers the days of punch cards (or at least the days of jokes about old guys and punch cards).

When he's not at work, he spends time with his wife and being a Geek Dad to his 4 sons. He's also a huge fan of comic books, single-malt scotch, Harley-Davidson motorcycles and hanging out in his nerd-cave playing 8-bit video games and tinkering with digital photography.

Connect with Jason on Twitter @ReadyTalkGeeks, @TheOEM or on LinkedIn.