ReadyTalk Hiring “Girls Gone Geek”

It occurred to me that the majority of applicants and candidates that I talk to on a day to day basis in the field of software development are primarily men.  Even within the walls of ReadyTalk we lack a certain female presence on the software development side.  I have done some research to find out the history of females in computer science. I am hoping I will be able to understand what the future may hold and how ReadyTalk can help support women in technology.

According to Wikipedia, the number of women represented in undergraduate computer science education and the white-collar information technology workforce peaked in the mid-1980's and has declined ever since.

Even more interesting is that Computer Science was originally a field that was led by women.  According to Wikipedia, Ada Lovelace was a famous female mathematician from the 1800's.  She is credited with being the first computer programmer for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general purpose computer.  Ada came up the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Ada Lovelace                     

 

Another very notable female computer scientist was Grace Hopper. Wikipedia provides a comprehensive overview on this talented female engineer.  Grace Hopper was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer.  She was a pioneer in the field and was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. Due to her naval rank and her accomplishments she is sometimes referred to as "Amazing Grace"

Grace Hopper

Most recently, Yahoo hired 37 year old Marissa Mayer as their CEO.  She is the youngest CEO of a Fortune 500 company.  Marissa graduated from a small town Wisconsin high school in 1993 and went on to graduate with honors from Stanford with a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and a M.S. in Computer Science. She was employee number 20 at Google and worked her way up the corporate ladder during her 13 year career with them.  On July 16th, 2012 Mayer announced she was the new President and CEO of Yahoo.  According to Wikipedia Mayer was named to Fortune magazine's annual list of America's Most Powerful Women in Business in 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011.  In 2008, at age 33, she was the youngest woman ever listed. 

Marissa Mayer

Women have been making their mark for a long time in the world of computer engineering. It will continue to take remarkable women like the above mentioned to peak young girl's interests in building careers in computer science and technology.  I think showing women that they can become computer scientists and supporting women in technology is a great start.

ReadyTalk has been named The Best Company to work for by Colorado Biz Magazine and Outside Magazine for a number of reasons.  A few benefits that may appeal to women include; excellent work/life balance, paid-maternity leave, tuition reimbursement, onsite yoga, chiropractor, massage, in-house dry cleaning services and on-site gym with locker rooms.  Health, family, work is the the order of priorities that ReadyTalk promotes and is something that the CEO follows himself.

There are several organizations which support Women in Computing and Women in Technology.  Some of which include Society of Women Engineers (SWE), National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT), Anita Borg institute for Women & Technology and Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing.

As a Talent Acquisition Manager for ReadyTalk I take great interest and pride in helping promote this cause and I am excited to see where we can go from here!

 

Thanks for your Feedback!

We recently wrapped up our annual customer survey at ReadyTalk and our teams are busy reviewing the valuable information you shared with us. Although we try to follow a simReadyTalk Services usedilar format to measure year-over-year results, we made some small modifications to this year's survey to maximize responder sentiment and give us actionable tools to improve our future performance.

First we asked how you were using our services. Are you planning large webinars or doing sales demos? Do you use our services for online training or collaborative meetings? How you responded here gave us greater insight into your subsequent responses. In comparing responses by use cases we were able to see both our strengths and weakness within certain user groups.

Next we used Net Promoter Score (NPS) to measure your likelihood to recommend ReadyTalk. NPS is widely seen as the benchmark for measuring customer loyalty. This score was shared companywide at ReadyTalk. We take great pride in our interactions with our customers, from customer care to product development, and were thrilled to earn an “excellent” rating. And we look forward to bettering that next year!

Finally we asked our responders to provide us with up to five specific feature requests they would like see from our service. This is where you really stepped up for us. We documented over 1400 product requests! This feedback is the most valuable information we have in helping us prioritize our development roadmap. Don’t be surprised to see many of this year’s feature requests as next year’s product releases.

Survey Feature Requests

So thanks again for participating in ReadyTalk's annual customer survey. As you can see, we take your feedback very seriously. And a special thanks to Denise Fenner at BSI Group. Denise was the winner of a $200 gift card for participating. Congratulations Denise!

How to Live Tweet a Webinar

Tweeting during a webinarLast month, Social Media Today shared an article of best practices for How to Live Tweet an Event. We all follow someone (or several someones) who suddenly post 10 times their normal volume because they are at an industry event or tradeshow. The SMT article has some great tips about how to do it without annoying your followers who may not care.

We often suggest webinar presenters use social media during their webinar. While the webinar interface has engagement tools like chat and polling, Twitter provides a great platform for engaging with attendees during and after a webinar, but webinar presenters and attendees should be careful not to annoy their twitter followers. Here are a few recommendations for both webinars attendees and presenters:

  • Let your followers know that you'll be attending (or presenting) a webinar: this gives them a chance to register if they are interested in the topic. It also gives them a heads up that you'll be tweeting about the event.
  • Make a note of the Twitter handles of the presenters. The presenters will likely share their handles on their introduction slide, so be sure to write them do to refer to throughout the webinar. 
  • If your a webinar host or presenter, assign someone from your team to monitor Twitter while you are presenting. They can gather questions, engage and keep the conversation flowing.
  • Ask questions via the conference interface as well as Twitter.
  • Follow other attendees, since these people likely have the same interest/concern as you.

What else would you add to the list?

From Tailgating to Tradeshowing

Mile High Station

Last Thursday, I attended my first tradeshow with ReadyTalk at Mile High Statio, a venue located next to Sports Authority Field at Mile High that is normally known as a pre-game tailgating spot. Arriving early in the morning dressed in business clothing, I experienced a different vibe than tailgating before a Broncos’ game. Not to worry, I brought my favorite Broncos water bottle to compensate.

“From Surviving to Thriving: Mastering Technology in your Marketing World” was the title of the BMA Colorado Event. Throughout the day, panels of industry experts spoke about topics including:

  • Evolution of marketing and advertising
  • Customer experience
  • Demand generation & marketing automation
  • Marriage of content and technology

Discussing customer experience hit home for me because customer experience is what ReadyTalk was built on and is in our company’s DNA. The panel stressed how vital it is to build a culture around customer experience and the long-term importance of it in the long run. It was cool listening to people speak about what a company should do to be more focused on their customers. While making a mental checklist, I quickly realized that ReadyTalk already does all of that!

Tradeshow booth

I enjoyed talking to folks in the industry about how they use audio and web conferencing, and what they’re doing in their webinars. I especially loved talking to people who were extremely happy using ReadyTalk as well as those who were interested in demoing our webinar platform.

Overall, the tradeshow was very informative. I walked away with more knowledge than when I arrived in the morning and met a lot of awesome people. The happy hour networking portion after the long day was key; it brought me right back to Mile High Station’s association with Denver Broncos tailgating. Now that’s what I call a successful day!
 

ReadyTalk for Salesforce…for the ReadyTalk Sales Team

The phrase "Eat your own dog food" rings true in the halls of ReadyTalk.  As web and audio conferencing provider, we constantly use our own service to connect with remote colleagues, hold meetings with prospects, assist customer with questions via our customer care team, and hold large-scale webinars for our lead generation efforts.  In addition, as a business, we are power users of salesforce.com, especially within our sales organization. And, as most of you are aware, our ReadyTalk for Salesforce application supports the sales use case.  I recently chatted with one of our account executives, Graham Smith, to get their perspective on our Salesforce application…how he uses it, what he likes, and what other features could help in the future.

What part of the ReadyTalk for Salesforce application do you use most often?

I use it on a daily basis to set up every product demo that I do.  From a prospect's lead record, I schedule a meeting for an upcoming date/time to conduct an online demo of ReadyTalk, discuss pricing, etc.  In addition, I also refer to the 'ReadyTalk Meeting History' section to quickly look back at past meetings I may have had with a lead (including the attendance duration), trainings they've participated in, or marketing webinars they've attended.  This information really helps to spark a conversation, especially when reaching out to a lead that I've been trying to re-connect with.

Does your sales manager use any of the reports or dashboards provided by ReadyTalk for Salesforce?

We take a look at them as part of my sales activity reviews.  The dashboards are easy to glance at while looking at overall metrics that our team is measured against. 

What other features would you like to see in the application?

One thing that would be really helpful is to be able to edit the ReadyTalk invitation directly from Salesforce.  I like to personalize each invitation I send out to my leads based on what we are going to cover, past items we've discussed, etc.

 

Are you a salesperson that could benefit from ReadyTalk for Salesforce? ReadyTalk will be at Dreamforce in September; schedule time for a demo (RSVP to party with us). If you're already using it, let us know what you think about it.