My Webinar is Over – Now What? and When?

As a follow up to our recent AMA webinar, “Can You Hear Me Now? Best Practices for Presenting to a Virtual Audience,” I tackle some questions about how to best follow up after a webinar.

That's all folksQ. In your experience what's a good follow-up after the webinar? Send out slides and thank you email? Any best practices?

A. First and foremost, continue the conversation as long as you can to realize the most ROI from all that work you just did.

Here are some other tips for post-webinar follow up:

  • Email your attendees and no-shows in a timely manner – preferably that same day. At the very least, send your attendees a ‘”thank you for attending” email. If you can include the slides in PDF format with the conference recording, do it – this is pretty much an expectation these days.
  • However, be careful not to over-promote that you’ll be sending a follow-up email with all that information, otherwise you risk cannibalizing your attendance numbers. If you do, you may see a lower percentage rate of attendees as compared to registrants.
  • As far as your no-shows…well, I’d consider whether or not they just need the material or whether you want them to attend another live presentation. If you just need to deliver the information to your audience, send it as they didn’t have the benefit of your live delivery. You could reach out via email or phone to ensure they understood everything. Or, you could take the opportunity to say “Sorry you missed it, join us for our next webinar next week.”
  • Post any additional questions and answers on your blog or Facebook page.
  • Be sure to repurpose your webinar recording in small snippets and use it on social media. You can choose to “gate” the material with a registration form to net new names for lead follow up.

With ReadyTalk’s meeting and recording registration tools, it’s easy to see who has attended your meetings as well as measure their engagement of the content. You can track who played, replayed and forwarded the recorded content.

Did you miss the webinar? Listen now and let me know what other questions you have.

Want to become an expert online presenter? Visit us soon as I kick off my new blog series on just that topic.

Customer Happiness: Why It’s Important to ReadyTalk

Smiley FaceLike many companies, we measure customer “happiness” at ReadyTalk with an annual customer survey.  We ask our customers a series of questions ranging from how they use our service to what feature requests they may have.

Most importantly we ask their likelihood to recommend our services to others, also known as Net Promoter Score or NPS. The answers can range from 0 (not at all likely) to 10 (extremely likely). The NPS score is then calculated by taking the percentage of Promoters (9s and 10s) subtracted by the percentage of Detractors (0 through 6).

We just closed our annual customer survey and are so thankful for all of the feedback we’ve received from our customers. Our response rate was right around 9%. The average customer response for likelihood to recommend our service was 8.51 (with 10 being the highest). This translates to a netpromoter score of 49

NPS overview

I then compared our Net Promoter Score to the average in the Techology and Telecommunications Industry.

  • ReadyTalk average NPS: 49% (54% in 2012)
  • Industry average NPS: 22.4%
  • Others in the conferencing space
    • Cisco (Webex) NPS: 50%
    • Adobe (Adobe Connect) NPS: 33%
    • Citrix (GoTo Meeting) NPS: 32 %

What's this mean to us? Happy customers (and employees), more customer referrals, and hopefully more sales.

Other “happiness” metrics:

  • Nearly 70,000 people worldwide have active ReadyTalk accounts
  • ReadyTalk boasts 99.9% service reliability
  • Delivered more than 125 million web conferencing minutes in 2013
  • ReadyTalk customers rate the product’s ease of use as a 4.27 out of 5.0

It takes us several weeks to compile and analyze all of the responses. We then use the information gleaned to determine what features to incorporate into our platform, how to prioritize launches, what third-party integrations are needed, and to understand our customers' perception of our product (whether we make them look professional, ease of use and how we care about their success). Internally we also recognize specific employees whom customers have "called out" as going above and beyond to ensure their success. 

Does your company measure customer “happiness”? Read more about " Using Your Net Promoter Score.'