Category Archives: Be productive

What are the best channels for promoting your webinar?

Imagine this: You've worked for days perfecting every little detail of your department's webinar. You've carefully designed the landing page, spiced up the slides to keep things interesting and brought on a team of great, charismatic people to pull it off. This sounds like the ideal webinar situation, right? Only if you've remembered to promote it! Otherwise, you might have done all this work for no one to stick around and enjoy it.

Webinars are a fantastic medium to connect with customers, gain valuable leads, conduct new product demos and train employees. With this in mind, you want to ensure you're doing everything in your power to reach a wide audience. To do so, here are three of the best channels you'll want to leverage to effectively promote your webinar:

1. Email
There are three main steps to promoting your webinar over email after people have signed up. First, you should send a thank-you email when attendees register online. This is not only demonstrating your company's good manners but also can serve as a way to put the date in their calendar or confirm their attendance. Second, you should send out reminder emails around a week or two in advance to not only remind them about your webinar's date but to keep them thinking about your company. Lastly, you want to send out a final reminder email the day before or the day of your webinar, as people get busy and forget.

2. LinkedIn
Sometimes emails are not the ideal way to promote your webinar, as people may feel overwhelmed with lots of reminder emails clogging up their inbox. Instead, consider reaching out to them over social media, more specifically, on LinkedIn. After all, LinkedIn reports that as much as 46% of B2B social media traffic comes from the site, so you don't want to miss out on this ideal marketing platform.

3. Twitter
If you want to go for a more casual promotional route, start marketing your webinar over Twitter! The platform provides a low-key approach to getting word out about your upcoming webinar without feeling overly pushy. You can start promoting the event a few weeks in advance and use inviting graphics and images to remind your followers in the days leading up to the webinar. Don't forget to include registration links in your tweets though!

Ready to spice up your lead generation process? Consider using webinars starting today!

3 reasons why we’re thankful for webinars

 

This December, ReadyTalk is taking time to reflect on what we’re thankful for, and it’s more than just good times and high fives. We’re passionate about the exciting benefits webinars can bring to businesses. With the right strategy, these online events can transform your company.

Here are three reasons why we’re thankful for webinars:

1. They engage audiences

Your clients are bombarded with a dizzying array of content on a daily basis. If you want to grab and keep their attention, then you need to provide high-value information in an engaging and entertaining package. Webinars enable your company to do just that. Rather than simply being yet another video clients need to watch, webinars are targeted events that allow for audience interaction via polling and other features. Clients can learn must-know information useful to their lives and businesses via a creative, fun and informative way. A quality webinar can get people’s attention in a media-saturated world; the average viewership per webcast is 53 minutes, according to ON24, giving you lots of time to present valuable information to your audience.

2. They generate more qualified leads

Webinars don’t only appeal to your current clients, but they also help you reach future ones more effectively than many other channels. Between 20 percent and 40 percent of webinar registrants turn into qualified leads, according to a survey we conducted with our clients.

This is because webinars by their nature filter out prospects who are more likely to be a dead-end. People who sign up for webinars are more willing to provide accurate data about themselves, such as their email addresses, because they want access to the event. Webinars are also an example of permission-based marketing, meaning that prospects themselves indicate that they want to learn more about your company by signing up, which is a strong sign that a lead can be nurtured through the sales cycle. For these reasons, webinars can give you a greater return on your investment when it comes to lead generation.

3. They establish your company as a trusted resource

Webinars offer a chance for your organization to share its expertise and know-how. When individuals tune into your webinar and receive information useful to their own lives or jobs, they’ll discover that your company is a helpful resource they’ll want to check in with again and again. High-quality webinars establish your company as a thought leader, and with the rich variety of ways webinars can be used, from product demos to Q+A sessions to industry updates, these events strengthen your brand identity while building connections with your target audiences.

Increased engagement levels, higher-quality leads and thought leadership are three reasons why we’re thankful for webinars. If your company is interested in experiencing the exciting benefits of webinars for itself, check out the helpful products and tools offered by ReadyTalk – we have everything you need to get started!

Video conferencing etiquette 101

Looking for the key that unlocks productivity and innovation at companies? Video conferencing is your answer, letting employees scattered across the globe to collaborate via face-to-face interaction. However, just like phone decorum calls for a "hello" and "goodbye," video conferencing requires its own set of manners.

To ensure you make a good impression on your boss and co-workers, here are some video conferencing etiquette guidelines:

Look presentable 

Just because you can call into a video meeting in your bedroom doesn't mean you can get away with wearing your pajamas. Treat the call like any other business meeting and wear what you would sport to the office (and maybe move from a stack of pillows to your desk). And please, wear pants, too. Even though screens will show only your upper half, you never know if the camera could fall or you'll need to get up for some reason, as Entrepreneur magazine pointed out. It pays to be prepared. 

Have a tidy background

Be conscious of your background before joining a video conference. Make sure the space behind you is clean and free of clutter; otherwise the meeting participants will be focused on the dirty dishes littering the table behind you more than your talking points. Use an even, face-level camera angle, too, as anything else is distracting. 

Set up good lighting 

You don't need to become a lighting expert before you dial in to a video meeting, but you should make sure the room will be bright enough for all callers to see your face clearly and without shadows. 

Keep your microphone muted 

You never know what's going to be amplified by your computer or headset microphone – your finger tapping, a fan running in the background, a dog barking, a car speeding down the street, etc. It's polite to keep your microphone on mute when you're not talking. 

Make eye contact 

It's human nature to have your eyes fixed on your beautiful face in the box at the bottom of the screen instead of on your webcam. However, looking directly into the camera is important because it helps you connect with your audience. 

Fight the urge to type

You may want to type notes during your video conference, but resist the temptation, the Wall Street Journal advised. Not only could it create noise if your microphone isn't on mute, but also other people may assume that you are working on something unrelated to the meeting. 

With these tips, you can have pitch-perfect video conferencing manners. 

3 scary things holding back collaboration at your company

Hair-raising horror movies, spookily decorated storefronts and ghoulish disguises galore: Halloween is nearly upon us, bringing its spine-tingling chills and thrills our way.

The frights of the holiday are all in good fun, but do you know what's truly terrifying? A company culture that stifles team work. That's because employees who put their heads together drive success. A recent study by the Institute for Corporate Productivity and Rob Cross, a global business professor at Babson College, found that companies that encouraged collaboration were five times as likely to be high performing, according to Forbes. 

Don't miss your opportunity to be a top-performing company. Here are five scary things holding back collaboration at your organization: 

1. A lack of trust 

As executive development expert Michael Bunting noted in an article for CEO Magazine, trust is the heart of collaboration. Employees need to feel that they can share their thoughts, opinions and feedback with each other and their managers without fear of negative repercussions. If workers feel there is no sense of trust, they are more likely to be afraid to share unconventional ideas or suggest new ways of doing things that could prove to be incredibly beneficial. If your workplace is tainted by the poison apples of defensiveness and an "every man for himself" mentality, there's no way fruitful collaboration will ever happen.

2. A culture of fear

Fear belongs in haunted houses – not in the office. Productive collaboration depends on people being able to admit that they may not have the specific skill sets needed for a project and then reaching out to others who do possess these abilities. However, employees who are scared to look weak will never ask for help, according to a Medium article written by Ant Cousins, director of customer success at ProFinda. To create a culture of collaboration, management can reward employees who ask for help. 

3. Outdated technology 

Clunky TV monitors and landlines may have looked cool in "Poltergeist," but in a modern workplace, they're collaboration killers. Unified communications, hosted voice and video conferencing make holding meetings and sharing ideas across a workforce seamless and stress-free, no matter where its employees are located.

A lack of trust, a culture of fear and outdated technology: These three factors are downright scary in the way they prevent collaboration at your company. But by recognizing and then taking steps to change these factors, you can face your fears and create a more connected and productive workforce. 

How to set fourth quarter goals the right way

 

The fourth quarter has started, and it’s time to set goals for what your company wants to achieve by the end of the year.

But not every goal is effective. The way you designate and describe your targets has a big impact on the likelihood you’ll reach them. Read on to learn how to set goals the right way in the fourth quarter:

Be realistic

Fourth quarter business is up against a set of obstacles not seen during the rest of the year, such as budgets running out and the holidays causing a slowdown in activity. Set goals that reflect the realities of the season, and let your company’s performance in fourth quarters past guide the goals you set this time around.

As author and business coach Marla Tabaka noted in an interview with Inc. magazine, if you usually have a slow season in the fourth quarter but have established more aggressive targets than ever before, you’re just setting yourself up to fail. Instead, set goals that are more realistic; the satisfaction you and your team feels once you achieve them will be a positive motivating force that helps you start the next year strong.

Connect the goals to employees

People are more motivated to achieve goals when the targets in question align with their personal ambitions.

The Executive Guide to Goal Setting from software firm AchieveIt cited an example of this principle at Coca-Cola. The company wanted employees to achieve goals that helped them fulfill the company’s mission statement, which was to increase shareholder value. However, some employees felt too disconnected from shareholders to feel motivated to achieve these goals. In response, Amy Bergin, a former training consultant for Coca-Cola, designed a program that involved having employees set their own goals and then link these goals to the corporate mission to establish a more personal sense of motivation. Look for ways at your organization to more closely entwine employees’ individual goals and companywide ambitions.

Consider phrasing

The goals that are more likely to be achieved are those that use specific language. Instead of simply vowing to generate more leads, quantify how many you hope to have by the end of the year, and in which industries or verticals, for example.

“The moment you focus on a goal, your goal becomes a magnet, pulling you and your resources toward it,” said goal-setting expert Ryan Blair in an interview with The Balance. “The more focused your energies, the more power you generate.”

Empower your employees the best you can by establishing goals that use clear and specific language.

Follow these tips to help set your team up for success in the home stretch of the year. Now go hit your goals out of the park!