CloudTalk: SaaS Sales in the Value Rep Business

Patrick Wiley has made his rounds at ReadyTalk for nearly a decade. Starting with the company as an account executive, he’s worked every stage of the buying cycle and continues building partnerships across the U.S. Now Director of Carrier Sales and Business Development, Patrick refers to himself as a “humble expert” in the SaaS and Unified Communications marketplace. Between training for ultramarathons and Ironman races, he loves improving his industry knowledge and building value in the ReadyTalk brand every day in order to win.

Q: Would you say there’s a high degree of problem solving with your job?

A: We work in an incredibly competitive business landscape and every situation is different. Saying that, I must keep my knowledge sharpened to provide the best solutions for our customers and partners. That means that I need to know about other companies’ products and services and figure out the best ways to position our solutions. I’m constantly researching and asking questions. Having a consultative sales approach not only provides a deeper level of trust, but also concludes with the customer buying the right solution to fit their company’s needs.

Q: Who are your primary business partners?

A: I work with over 40 account directors and account managers at the enterprise level. They’re responsible for selling our suite of solutions including a multitude of our competitors’ products. But that’s the great part about my job — I have to know when our product(s) are going to be the best fit for their needs. That’s when it’s very important for me to know every granular detail about our functionality and our competitors. We have four major lines of business, each with their own set of base features. But with every one of our products, there are unlimited combinations of à la carte options suited for each individual buyer. That’s the beauty of our products, they can accommodate so many different users and situations.

Q: Why do you refer to yourself as a “humble expert?”  

A: First off it means I am self aware enough that I don’t know everything. But, I am smart enough to tap into the many incredibly intelligent forward-thinking people I’m surrounded by at ReadyTalk. When I’m brought into a sales discussion I’m there representing more than one company. I speak for the carrier and the representative first, however I do my best to deliver the message with the ReadyTalk ethos which is the “wow” factor. That creates an interesting dynamic because I need to be thoughtful about what all parties can deliver, and even what they can’t. I’m the voice for the carrier team, so giving a measured account of our services is critical to everyone involved. The good news there — ReadyTalk has ALWAYS been customer centric. We tend to act this way naturally.

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Justin McHeffey

Justin McHeffey

Justin is responsible for creating content and generating leads for ReadyTalk’s Webcast and Webinar solutions. Focusing specifically on the marketing buyer, his work includes email nurture and cross-sell programs, sales enablement, collateral development, and hosting webinars for customers and prospects. He has held a wide range of marketing and communications roles in retail, event promotion, and the news media. Justin began his career as a TV meteorologist where he grew a storm chasing fan base and improved market position for the CBS affiliate in Denver.

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