The 4th “P” in Podcasting: Planning

So far, my blogs on podcasting have served up 3 "Ps" talking about the "Popularity" of podcasting, the "Pros" of including podcasting in your communication strategy, and the "Possibilities" for podcasting topics. Now I'll add some meat to those "Ps", meaning I'll try to give you some information on podcasting that you can actually use. In this blog, I'll discuss how to "Plan" your podcasts (yes, I'm still dishing out "Ps").

One of the most common problems that plagues podcasting is "podfading," which occurs when the podcasts become less and less frequent or stop altogether. It's estimated that a fifth of all podcasts end before the tenth episode. This may often be the result of poor planning. Upfront planning can save you lots of time, aggravation, and disappointment with your podcasts.

Here are some things to think about as you plan your podcasts:

  • Don't podcast just to podcast. Make sure that podcasting is the most appropriate communications medium for the information you're trying to deliver.

 

  • Know your audience. Know who you expect to listen to your podcasts and make sure you are providing them with content that is valuable and relevant to them.

 

 

  • Pick the right length and frequency for your podcasts. This mostly depends on the content and audience. In general, shorter is better because people always have more important things to do. The priority of those other tasks goes up the longer your podcast.

 

 

  • Be consistent. Developing a consistent theme, tone, format, length and frequency lets your listeners know what to expect from one podcast to the next. It also establishes a framework that makes it easier for you to create the podcasts.


Planning itself won't necessarily make your podcasts perfect, but it may keep you from biting off more than you can chew, or creating podcasts that your audience will find unpalatable.

 

 

[tags]B2B, Customer Service, Human Resource, Marketing, Podcasting, Public Relations, Sales, Social Media[/tags]

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