Tag Archives: productivity

How remote work helps the environment

 

Remote working has lots of benefits: increased productivity, lower overhead costs and greater employee engagement. But there’s another major benefit that you shouldn’t overlook.

Remote working helps the environment.

If you want to save the planet, why not start at your desk? Below are several reasons why remote working helps the environment based on statistics from the Environmental Protection Agency and the Tech.co Global Workforce Analytics report (and if you want a handy infographic summing it all up, we have that too).

Remote work saves gas

The office commute is the bane of the modern worker’s existence. Eliminate that step, and you’ve also helped soothe the collective psyche of not only humanity but also Mother Nature. Employees who work remotely just 50 percent of the time save 54 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions. That’s equivalent to taking 11 million cars off the road for a year, as well as the amount of carbon sequestered by 1.4 billion tree seedlings grown for 10 years.

Remote workers also avoid 119 billion miles of highway driving – that’s the mileage equivalent to circling the Earth 4.7 million times. If the image of commuters mindlessly driving around the world 4.7 million times – and all the road rage that comes with it – doesn’t scare you into making some environmental changes, then we don’t know what will.

Remote work uses less energy

Computers are incredible tools for helping us do nearly anything these days, including saving energy. The greenhouse gas emissions saved by remote workers telecommuting just 50 percent of the time was equal to the amount of electricity used by 8 million homes in one year.

Remote work decreases wear and tear

According to to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Americans take 1.1 billion car trips a day. Some 15 percent of these trips are for commuting, which comes out to 165 million driving commutes taking place each day. In addition to the greenhouse gas emissions and energy usage, having that many cars on the road every day is just plain bad for infrastructure. Roads, highways and parking garages deteriorate over time, and vehicles start having issues – leading to more car purchases. Nixing the commute and working from home protects the infrastructure around you, meaning less energy used to make costly repairs and upgrades.

Remote work helps save the environment, and when you add in using the right tools like video conferencing and unified communications, you can make sure it’s a productivity boon for your business, too.

Boost Productivity with Spring Cleaning!

Spring has officially sprung, and what better way to start off the season than with some spring cleaning. While most of us break out the dust rags and mops to clean our homes, we sometimes forget about cleaning the place where we spend most of our time—our work space.  It doesn’t matter if you work from home or an office building, it’s important to have a clean, organized space.

A cluttered desk and dirty office can say a lot about you. Most workers (57 percent) admit to judging coworkers by the cleanliness of their workspaces, according to a survey by staffing firm Adecco.

An organized desk not only looks nicer, but it makes it easier to find items, which helps you save time and become more efficient, effective and productive.

The following 4 tips will help you get your desk nice and tidy.

  1.      Get rid of old papers

Chances are, you have a large stack of papers sitting on your desk or stuffed in a drawer. Go through those and decide if you still need them. If you no longer need the papers, throw them away. If you still need to hang on to them for a little while longer, create a filing system so you can quickly find the documents when you need to refer to them.

  1.      Clear out your junk drawer

To quickly rid things from desktops, people sometimes throw everything into the nearest desk drawer. As time goes on, this drawer fills up with random objects. Go through your junk drawer and decide what you can get rid of. Organize the remaining items so you can easily open the drawer and see what’s inside. Check back every so often to make sure it doesn’t start to overflow again.

  1.      Organize your computer

When you can’t make out the picture on the background of your computer, it’s time to de-clutter your desktop. As you come across files and folders you don’t need, send them to the recycling bin. For everything else, create a filing system that will make it easy to find the things you need. Also, don’t forget to empty your recycle bin every once in a while.

  1.      Tidy up once a week

Fridays are generally slow and quiet around the office. Take advantage of this down time and clean your desk. Dispose of trash, rinse out all of your coffee cups and get rid of any other things you no longer need. Think about how happy you’ll be on Monday when you sit down at your clean desk.

Keeping your space clean and organized will not only help keep you sane, but will also keep your productivity level high.

Happy Spring Cleaning!

 

The Big “P” – Purpose at Work

Do you ever wonder what motivates people? American psychologist Abraham Maslow sought to answer this very question throughout his life’s work. Though he greatly contributed to the study of psychology, he was best known for his hierarchy of needs, which is represented in a five stage pyramid divided into basic, psychological and growth needs.

The top tier of Maslow’s hierarchy is self-actualization, which is the need to achieve one’s fullest potential and feel like you are making a difference. In essence, those who are enlightened can then help others down the hierarchy to achieve their fullest potential — like by doing more charitable work.

And emotional intelligence is not the same as enlightenment, although one could argue enlightened people are emotionally intelligent. People who’ve found purpose flourish — thrive in ways they can help others.

But this sense of purpose is not only essential in daily life, but is a critical component to creating a meaningful, happy workplace.

Why is having a purpose at work important?

Maybe in the early 1900s it was okay to drudge to work to collect a pay check. But that’s not what most workers want. They want to feel happy. They want to do work they find meaningful. And they want to do work they really love doing.

After all, when you’re doing work you love doing, it’s no longer — really — work.

What does this mean for companies – it improves business

Happiness = engagement

A recent Deloitte survey found that 73% of employees who identify as working for a purpose-driven organization report that they are engaged in the office. This number starkly contrasts the 23 percent of engaged employees who say that they do not work for a purpose-driven company.

Better productivity

A sense of purpose improves workHappier employees are 12% more productive. And if employees are doing purposeful work and work they love doing, the quality will be better and there’ll be fewer accidents, too. They’re even more likely to mentor other employees, helping leadership in your organization.

Employee retention

Also it helps employee retention. Employees who are challenged and engaged are less likely to leave. That decreases turnover costs, which run — according to SHRM — about half of an employees’ salary just in finding a replacement. That’s added on to the cost of actually getting the new employee — paying him.

Better customer service

Best of all, happy employees make for happy customers. If employees are achieving more and doing their best work, customers will notice.

As mentioned above, if employees are enlightened, they’ll be more willing to help customers (and other employees) to be enlightened as well.

How can you foster this need?

Integrating purpose at your business must begin at the ground up. Re-evaluate your mission statement, determining whether or not your company’s goals truly match up with its organizational structure, rewards system, market approach and more. If not or if you believe your mission is lacking, you may need to completely pivot and change directions.

Once you finalize your new mission statement, make sure that your employees’ personal goals are in sync with your organization’s. Understand what really drives them and why they chose to work at your particular company. Then, channel this energy into how your organization operates and rewards its high-performing staff. Meanwhile, create a positive atmosphere, where managers provide meaningful feedback and one-on-one sessions to keep everyone on the same page and motivated to do their work well.

Ways to engage employees